Pedigree safely monitor. Standards MPR, TCO, and other vaccinations

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Standards MPR

This is the first system of standards governing the restrictions on the power of electrostatic, electric and magnetic fields for the computer and office equipment. The standards developed by the National Department of the Swedish standard (SWEDAC - Swedish National Board for Measurement and Testing) together with the Institute of fissile material (SSI). MPR II also includes recommended guidelines. These guidelines are based on the concept that people live and work in places where there are already magnetic and electric fields, so the devices that we use, such as a monitor, should not create electric and magnetic fields greater than those already exist.

At first, in 1987 there was the standard MPR I, but it is not widely used. In 1990 came the standard MPR II, who in the same year was approved in EU countries as essential. MPR II requirements are taken into account in the development of comprehensive standards TCO. Most modern monitors today is performed in accordance with the recommendations of the standard MPR II or TCO. Although the impact on the fields is still under discussion, it was decided that if such an effect is, by using a screen with MPR II fields generated by the monitor will have a relatively low level compared with the fields generated by other electrical and office equipment.


Electric fields


frequency band


valid values


surface electrostatic potential


less than 500


5 Hz - 2 kHz


not more than 25 V / m *


2 kHz - 400 kHz


not more than 2.5 V / m


Magnetic fields


frequency band


valid values


5 Hz - 2 kHz


no more than 200 nT


2 kHz - 400 kHz


no more than 25 nT

Table 1.
Restrictions on emissions from electrostatic, electric and magnetic fields on the standard MPR II.

* Indicators are measured at a distance of 50 cm.

Also standard MPR II normalized following visual parameters:

• background color or symbol;
• The brightness of the screen or the cursor;
• average brightness;
• uniformity of brightness;
• diffuse reflectance;
• jitter;
• calculated the critical flicker frequency;
• the size and character of distortion;
• non-linearity;
• non-orthogonality;
• modulation factor raster scanning frequency;
clarity;
• reflection coefficient of the bezel.

Currently, a next version of the standard - MPR III.

Standards TCO

Abbreviation TCO stands for Swedish Federation of Trade Unions. During the development of the standard TCO are four organizations: the Federation itself, the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (Naturskyddforeinegen - The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), the National Committee of Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK) and measuring the company SEMKO AB.

The company SEMKO AB is engaged in testing and certification of electrical appliances. This independent unit of the group British Inchcape. SEMKO AB has developed tests for certification and verification device certified under the standard TCO.

In developing the regulations are taken into account the latest technological advances, as well as the recommendations of various global institutions such as VESA, EPA, and committees of the United Nations and UNESCO. TCO'99 is currently one of the most stringent standards in the world.

«TCO (The Swedish Confederation of Professional Employees, the Swedish Confederation of Professional groups of workers), with a membership of 1.3 million Swedish professional organization consists of 19 organizations that work together to improve the working conditions of its members. These 1.3 million. Members represent a broad spectrum of workers and employees in the public and private sector. TCO has nothing to do with politics or religion, which is one of the key reasons that allows you to combine various collective members under the roof of one organization. Teachers, engineers, economists, secretaries and nurses only a few of the groups that together form the TCO. This means that the TCO reflects a large slice of society that gives it broad support. "

It was a quote from a document of TCO. The fact that more than 80% of employees and workers in Sweden are dealing with computers, so the main task of TCO - is to develop safety standards when working with computers, that is to provide its members and all other safe and comfortable workplace. In addition to the development of safety standards, TCO involved in the creation of special tools for testing monitors and computers.

Standards TCO developed to guarantee the safe operation of computer users. These standards must comply with each monitor sold in Sweden and in Europe. Recommendations TCO monitors used by manufacturers to create better products that are less hazardous to the health of users. The essence of the recommendations of the TCO is not only in the definition of allowable values ​​of various types of radiation, but also in determining the minimum acceptable parameters monitors, for example, supported resolutions, the luminescence intensity of the phosphor, the stock brightness, power consumption, noise, and so on. D. Moreover, in addition to the requirements in the documents TCO provides detailed testing methodology monitors. Recommendations are used as TCO in Sweden and in all European countries to determine the standard parameters to be met by all monitors. First standard was designed to TCO'91 (TCO Screen Facts, 1991), but it is not widely used. Today, part of the recommendations developed by TCO includes three standards: TCO'92, TCO'95, and TCO'99, the numbers indicate the year of adoption.

Most of the measurements during the test for compliance with TCO held at a distance of 30 cm in front of screen at a distance of 50 cm from the monitor. For comparison, during the testing of monitors for compliance with another standard MPR II, all measurements are made at a distance of 50 cm in front and around the monitor screen. This explains the fact that the TCO standards are more stringent than MPR II.

TCO'92

Pedigree safely monitor.  Standards MPR, TCO, and other vaccinations
Standard TCO'92 has been developed exclusively for the monitors and determines the value of the maximum permissible electromagnetic radiation during operation of the monitor, as well as setting the standard for energy-saving function monitors.

1. Table 2 shows the values ​​of electric and magnetic fields for all standards TCO, since the date of the first standard TCO'91 these values ​​have not changed.


Electric fields


frequency band


valid values


surface electrostatic potential


less than 500


5 Hz - 2 kHz


not more than 10 V / m
(30 cm in front of a 50 cm around)


2 kHz - 400 kHz


not more than 1 V / m
(30 cm in front of a 50 cm around)


Magnetic fields


frequency band


valid values


5 Hz - 2 kHz


no more than 200 nT
(30 cm in front of a 50 cm around)


2 kHz - 400 kHz


no more than 25 nT
(Around 50 cm)

Table 2.
Restrictions on emissions from electrostatic, electric and magnetic fields on the standard TCO'91 - TCO'99.

2. The display should be equipped with an automatic shutdown function. This means that the display should be switched off automatically when it is not in use to reduce energy consumption and radiation. Suppliers can choose two alternatives listed below to satisfy these requirements.


Option A:
the display is automatically switched off in two stages


Step 1 (A1)


The display automatically switches to standby mode in which consumption can not be more than 30 watts. The display should be ready to restart within three seconds if the keyboard or mouse activated.


Step 2 (A2)


If the display is not re-activated after a delay it off. Consumption in this mode can not exceed 8 watts. (Time for switching is same as in the manual close).


Some displays can set timeouts and off independently and thus determine the energy consumption.


Option B:
the display is switched off in just one step


Step 1 (B1)


The display automatically switches to standby mode in which consumption can not exceed 15 watts, and must be able to restart within three seconds if the keyboard or mouse activated.


You can also determine the length of time after which the display switches to standby mode. This option saves energy less than the option A.

Table 3.
Two versions of the automatic function off NUTEK.

NUTEK recommends option A. Option B was primarily designed for terminals (according to specification NUTEK 803299/94).

3. In addition, the display must meet European fire and electrical safety requirements. This means the user does not have to be subjected to risk of electric shock, and there should be no ignition due to incorrect design or assembly (according to EN 60 950)
It should also be noted that at present the EEC prohibits the sale of monitors not compliant with TCO'92.

TCO'95

Pedigree safely monitor.  Standards MPR, TCO, and other vaccinations
TCO'95 standard applies to all personal computer that is on the monitor, system unit and keyboard and concerns ergonomic properties, radiation (electric and magnetic fields, noise and heat), energy saving and environmental conditions (with a mandatory requirement to adapt product and process Production at the factory). TCO'95 Standard TCO'92 there along with and does not abolish it. TCO'95 requirements with respect to electromagnetic radiation monitors are not more stringent than those of TCO'92. With regard to ergonomics TCO'95 imposes more stringent requirements than the international standard ISO 9241. Note that the LCD and plasma displays can also be certified by the standards TCO'92 and TCO'95, as, indeed, and laptop computers.

TCO'99

Pedigree safely monitor.  Standards MPR, TCO, and other vaccinations
TCO'99 imposes more stringent requirements than TCO'95 in the following areas: ergonomics (physical, visual and usability), energy radiation (electric and magnetic fields), environment and ecology, as well as fire and electrical safety. TCO'99 also requires new methods of testing. Standard TCO'99 extends to traditional CRT-monitors, flat panel displays (Flat Panel Displays), laptop computers (Laptop and Notebook), system unit and keyboard. Specifications TCO'99 contain requirements of the standards taken TCO'95, ISO, IEC and EN, and of EC Directive 90/270 / EEC and the Swedish national standard MPR 1990: 8 (MPRII) and from earlier recommendations TCO. The development of the standard TCO'99 attended TCO, Naturskyddsforeningen and and Statens Energimyndighet (The Swedish National Energy Administration, the Swedish National Agency for Energy). The first monitors were certified under the standard TSO'99 October 29, 1998.

Initially, environmental standards applied only to monitors as really the most unsafe computer. Developers interested only in minimizing the level of various radiations. TSO'92 in this sense has been very tough. TSO'95 only expanded the scope of the TCO, the first attempt to somehow describe computers. In addition, special attention was paid to environmental protection in the production process and harmless disposal after the service life of all certified products. TSO'99 also mainly focuses on ergonomics, ecology and environmental protection. Under the standard now fall separately monitors with LCD TV, computers, laptops and keyboards. More about TCO'99 read the next part.

To be continued